Magikarp is Boss, Aracnine is Legendary

Well you all (two) have had a long wait. Here’s something for you. I suppose this is technically more of an analysis. The picture here, courtesy of animemb.com and by no means my own picture, depicts a very stylized drawing of the pokemon, Gyarados and Magikarp. Why do I wish to focus on these two today? I just discovered some interesting facts about these guys.

First of all, these guys are based in Chinese (not Japanese or other Asian, honestly) mythology. It is said there that, if a carp successfully climbs its way up a waterfall, it will become a dragon. That is what Magikarp was based off of. I know that I’m about to be repetitive, but Gyarados also gained the move, “waterfall” when the Johto region was introduced.

Does this sort of mythology hold true for other pokemon? Of course it does. When creating video games, one of the richest resources to delve into is mythology, as I went over with Ballos. The more obscure the myth is, the more original the character sounds. I suppose the easiest thing to do is to name what myths legendary pokemon are based off of, but that’s the easy route. Imma do something different just because I like making life difficult for myself.

When I was younger and played my brother’s copy of pokemon silver a lot, we got into a discussion about legendary pokemon. He claimed that there was only one legendary pokemon and I, having been very linear thinking, argued stalwartly against him. I named off the legendary birds (Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres), the legendary guinea pigs (Entei, Raikou, and Suicune) as well as Mew and Mew Two. He didn’t back down, pulled out his gameboy, and showed me his pokedex. Much like how Jigglypuff’s pokemon type is balloon, Arcanine was the legendary type pokemon. The only legendary type pokemon. I was dumfounded and only recently discovered why arcanine is considered legendary.

The main thing the pokedex speaks of them as is regal. I have, however, found them represented as protectors on occasion. I haven’t seen many myths or legends that seem to fit right, but I figured there had to be some reason to make them legendary. After many books (and one lucky picture I found on the interwebs) I have determined that Arcanine is based off of the Chinese Xiezhi. You know those things that you think are lion statues? They aren’t always lions. These statues symbolize these creatures who seem to have a strict sense of order, law, and justice. Similar statues are found in Korea guarding certain buildings, but I feel as though Arcanine fits the Chinese Xiezhi better than the Korean Haetae. First of all, the Heart Gold pokedex entry says “this legendary Chinese pokemon…” I may be mistaken, but I don’t think it’s Korean. Now granted, the Xiezhi is sometimes called a legendary goat and it also has horns, but if you look at the statues by the Ming Tombs, you will see they definitely have more resemblance to Arcanine than any goat I’ve ever seen. Add to this the fact that, also in Chinese mythology, tigers are said to kill evil people and protect good, you can see further similarity to the Xiezhi. The tiger is also said to ward off fire, which explains why Arcanine is a fire-element pokemon. I suppose they could have used rock or ground, considering statues, or water, simply because it’s more often used against fire, but a tiger just seems more like it would control the fire instead of supressing it. Yeah, it has that kind of power.

Hopefully you don’t consider this a waste of your time. If you skipped to the bottom, basically, Magikarp is based off of Chinese mythology, as is Arcanine. The mythology is what causes Arcanine to be legendary and Magikarp just happens to be one BA fish for being able to change like that after doing something that every salmon attempts before dying a sad, lonely death. Have a great awesome
.


Okay, I have tended not to post bits of fridge logic due to a lack of finding any. Now, I’ve been having a few irl realizations. People talk all the time. I’m sure everyone has noticed something to this extent. However, have you ever thought of the meanings behind the words you say unless there is something serious you are trying to bring across? I’m sure some people reading this can quite easily confirm this to be true for themselves without a second thought. I, on the other hand, have to put a great deal of thought into this. Careful consideration and all that… stuff.

Anyway, yeah. People are talking all the time. I talk all the time. People just seem to talk. Less often, however, do people actuallysayanything. I know, I know. This is a commonly debated topic. Everybody thinks about this at some point in their lives and, more often than not, the results that return are somewhat cynical. New years means I’m looking at new ways of doing things. You know how I said that I don’t think people tend to think about what they say? You also don’t tend to think about your breathing or where you’re putting your feet or similar appendages when you walk or where you are and what’s going on around you or what you’re eating or even what you’re doing unless there’s some sort of obstacle stopping you from doing so easily. When you cease to think about what you’re doing, whatever you’re doing loses meaning. It’s just something that happens. You don’t get a feeling of accomplishment at things you don’t work at and therefore don’t think about.

Where is this going? What the heck is the crazy typing man on a laptop in his family room trying to say to the few people he hopes will care enough to read this? This is essentially my resolution and a challenge for any who may read this. Everything you do, it doesn’t matter what it is, but whenever you do or don’t do something, think. Think long and hard. It can be alone or with someone or with multiple someones. You sit down; think about where you sat and why you sat there. Make observances about what’s going on around you. Look closely at your scenery and take in the little intricacies, the little marvels everywhere. When you eat, think about what you’re eating. Not the technical things like calories and food groups, but the more aesthetic bits. Do you actually enjoy what you’re eating? Why? What’s so enjoyable? What do you say? Do your words have meaning? Put serious thought into every answer, even if it’s commonplace. When someone says “do you understand?” actually debate in your head whether or not you truly understand. Don’t answer reflexively, but instead make every word you say count for something. People are too careless and unattached nowadays. Let’s make a movement. Let’s put effort into the world. Let’s make living and being a human being and interacting with people actually mean something again.

I won’t be surprised if you simply skipped down to here. It’s a lot of text. I’ll summarize nonetheless for those of you who don’t or can’t put in the few extra seconds to read the rest. Think. If you need an expansion on that, then just read what’s above.

So long until next post. I’m going to look at the sky for a while. I don’t look up often enough.


garryguertena:


fridgelogic-and-philosophy:


I was just playing Cave Story… again. This has got to be about the eleventh or above time I’ve done so. At any rate, when I first started this blog, two ideas were in my head. One was the deal with Ballos’ name. That was my first post. I was going to post the second, then realized I was jumping to conclusions and to bring notice to such a fanciful idea was just plain unprofessional. Recently, however, I purchased Cave Story + on Steam. In this version, the dialogue is somewhat changed, mostly for the worse in my opinion, but there are worse things that could have happened. One line in particular caught me off guard upon hearing for the, I don’t know, sixth time? You speak with a woman in the sand zone named Jenka and this guy right here says “Hello auntie.” This guy’s name is Balrog. He was one of the two antagonists who were cursed. Now here’s the part where this blows your mind.
(Spoiler/) Ballos says at the end that he watched his wife and son burn/die as he laughed. This way you know that he had a family other than his older sister, Jenka. I had previously looked for any connection between Balrog and Ballos that would explain Balrog’s reason for being bound to the crown. I had also seen the similarities in the names and wondered if Pixel had something in mind other than “a balrog is a big, strong monster and this toaster is rather tank-like.” I had thought about whether or not Ballos could have been Balrog’s father, but there wasn’t enough evidence. Later, I thought that Misery had created him, and he had to follow Misery’s orders, not the crowns. He later said himself that he was under the curse of the crown. That ruled out that idea and I just let that train of thought die, until I paid closer attention to the line previously mentioned.
He calls Jenka auntie. The only sibling Jenka is ever mentioned to have is Ballos. She would thus be the aunt of Ballos’ late son. If Ballos killed his son, then how would Balrog have Jenka as an aunt unless we pulled new characters out of our… well, you know where that was going. Anyway, let’s say BalrogwasBallos’ son. They look nothing alike. Balrog is either robotic or a heavily armored biological being. Ballos is a… wizard? Warlock? Human seeming, at least. On top of that, the fact that he killed his son is still glaring at us coldly. So Ballos killed his son Balrog. Balrog may have been perfectly human-ish back then. Jenka seals Ballos away as his magic rages out of control. Left behind are his poor son’s charred bones or other such remains. Then comes Misery, there to get her uncle to forge the demon crown. Naturally, the loss of her cousin and aunt didn’t go without affecting her mentally in some way. She, too, is a witch. On top of that, she has a talent for creating zombies, as seen by the dragons and the core. She, therefore, has some experience with resurrections in a way. She sees her cousin’s remains. Either she creates a new body for his soul to live in (like the Alfons Elric in “Full Metal Alchemist”) or she has that body made and, using the powers of the Demon Crown, puts her cousin’s soul/personality into it.
If the latter is true, then that explains why he’s bound to the crown; he’s a product of it. If it was the former, then the details are a little more blurry and the train of thought has likely reached a dead end. Either way, though, it explains why he always does what Misery says. He owes her his life. (/end_Spoiler)
To wrap up what we’ve learned, I’d say that Balrog is Ballos’ son’s immortal soul transferred into the body of a rocket-launching toaster with a debt owed to his cousin and a curse bestowed upon him. GOOD DAY!- err, night.
Picture taken from the Cave Story wiki.


What if Balrog wasn’t completely transferred into his toaster body and the part of him that didn’t make it became Puu Black?


That is possible. Or here’s another idea.
Balrog had a mother who also met the same fate. Perhaps the technique used on Balrog had been tried on his mother first with a small degree of failure. What was left was the non-physical manifestation of her soul. Puu Black was a nurse and is seen at the end caring for people at the labyrinth clinic. You could call Puu Black motherly. If we say that this makes sense on the lines of what happened to Balrog, then his form is result of a slightly modified, initially presumed failed, spell to bring life back to the living.

garryguertena:

fridgelogic-and-philosophy:

I was just playing Cave Story… again. This has got to be about the eleventh or above time I’ve done so. At any rate, when I first started this blog, two ideas were in my head. One was the deal with Ballos’ name. That was my first post. I was going to post the second, then realized I was jumping to conclusions and to bring notice to such a fanciful idea was just plain unprofessional. Recently, however, I purchased Cave Story + on Steam. In this version, the dialogue is somewhat changed, mostly for the worse in my opinion, but there are worse things that could have happened. One line in particular caught me off guard upon hearing for the, I don’t know, sixth time? You speak with a woman in the sand zone named Jenka and this guy right here says “Hello auntie.” This guy’s name is Balrog. He was one of the two antagonists who were cursed. Now here’s the part where this blows your mind.

(Spoiler/) Ballos says at the end that he watched his wife and son burn/die as he laughed. This way you know that he had a family other than his older sister, Jenka. I had previously looked for any connection between Balrog and Ballos that would explain Balrog’s reason for being bound to the crown. I had also seen the similarities in the names and wondered if Pixel had something in mind other than “a balrog is a big, strong monster and this toaster is rather tank-like.” I had thought about whether or not Ballos could have been Balrog’s father, but there wasn’t enough evidence. Later, I thought that Misery had created him, and he had to follow Misery’s orders, not the crowns. He later said himself that he was under the curse of the crown. That ruled out that idea and I just let that train of thought die, until I paid closer attention to the line previously mentioned.

He calls Jenka auntie. The only sibling Jenka is ever mentioned to have is Ballos. She would thus be the aunt of Ballos’ late son. If Ballos killed his son, then how would Balrog have Jenka as an aunt unless we pulled new characters out of our… well, you know where that was going. Anyway, let’s say BalrogwasBallos’ son. They look nothing alike. Balrog is either robotic or a heavily armored biological being. Ballos is a… wizard? Warlock? Human seeming, at least. On top of that, the fact that he killed his son is still glaring at us coldly. So Ballos killed his son Balrog. Balrog may have been perfectly human-ish back then. Jenka seals Ballos away as his magic rages out of control. Left behind are his poor son’s charred bones or other such remains. Then comes Misery, there to get her uncle to forge the demon crown. Naturally, the loss of her cousin and aunt didn’t go without affecting her mentally in some way. She, too, is a witch. On top of that, she has a talent for creating zombies, as seen by the dragons and the core. She, therefore, has some experience with resurrections in a way. She sees her cousin’s remains. Either she creates a new body for his soul to live in (like the Alfons Elric in “Full Metal Alchemist”) or she has that body made and, using the powers of the Demon Crown, puts her cousin’s soul/personality into it.

If the latter is true, then that explains why he’s bound to the crown; he’s a product of it. If it was the former, then the details are a little more blurry and the train of thought has likely reached a dead end. Either way, though, it explains why he always does what Misery says. He owes her his life. (/end_Spoiler)

To wrap up what we’ve learned, I’d say that Balrog is Ballos’ son’s immortal soul transferred into the body of a rocket-launching toaster with a debt owed to his cousin and a curse bestowed upon him. GOOD DAY!- err, night.

Picture taken from the Cave Story wiki.

What if Balrog wasn’t completely transferred into his toaster body and the part of him that didn’t make it became Puu Black?

That is possible. Or here’s another idea.

Balrog had a mother who also met the same fate. Perhaps the technique used on Balrog had been tried on his mother first with a small degree of failure. What was left was the non-physical manifestation of her soul. Puu Black was a nurse and is seen at the end caring for people at the labyrinth clinic. You could call Puu Black motherly. If we say that this makes sense on the lines of what happened to Balrog, then his form is result of a slightly modified, initially presumed failed, spell to bring life back to the living.

(via theold-monsieurspectre)


SORRY

… for the lack of quality in recent posts. Fridge logic doesn’t follow a schedule. In order to give you all something to look at between more professional posts, I’ve been practically putting anything that loosely fits into this category on here. Therefore, here’s my question:

Do you want me to make less regular, higher quality posts or keep these fillers in between the big ones?


This guy. You see him? He is the king/emperor of Atlantis. This picture is courtesy of the Atlantis wiki. (noticing a pattern of where I get my sources?) Now here’s something some of you may not know. He is voiced by Leonard Nimoy.
For those of you who don’t know, Leonard Nimoy plays Spock in Star Trek. Spock is a member of the alien race known as vulcans. Furthermore, vulcans occasionally go through a phase called “Pon Far” where, if they don’t mate, they die. A webcomic, called “Weregeek,” pointed out to me that ferrets go through something similar.
Therefore, through use of the transitive property, we can state that the emperor of Atlantis is a blind space ferret. Enjoy your awesome.

This guy. You see him? He is the king/emperor of Atlantis. This picture is courtesy of the Atlantis wiki. (noticing a pattern of where I get my sources?) Now here’s something some of you may not know. He is voiced by Leonard Nimoy.

For those of you who don’t know, Leonard Nimoy plays Spock in Star Trek. Spock is a member of the alien race known as vulcans. Furthermore, vulcans occasionally go through a phase called “Pon Far” where, if they don’t mate, they die. A webcomic, called “Weregeek,” pointed out to me that ferrets go through something similar.

Therefore, through use of the transitive property, we can state that the emperor of Atlantis is a blind space ferret. Enjoy your awesome.


I was just playing Cave Story… again. This has got to be about the eleventh or above time I’ve done so. At any rate, when I first started this blog, two ideas were in my head. One was the deal with Ballos’ name. That was my first post. I was going to post the second, then realized I was jumping to conclusions and to bring notice to such a fanciful idea was just plain unprofessional. Recently, however, I purchased Cave Story + on Steam. In this version, the dialogue is somewhat changed, mostly for the worse in my opinion, but there are worse things that could have happened. One line in particular caught me off guard upon hearing for the, I don’t know, sixth time? You speak with a woman in the sand zone named Jenka and this guy right here says “Hello auntie.” This guy’s name is Balrog. He was one of the two antagonists who were cursed. Now here’s the part where this blows your mind.
(Spoiler/) Ballos says at the end that he watched his wife and son burn/die as he laughed. This way you know that he had a family other than his older sister, Jenka. I had previously looked for any connection between Balrog and Ballos that would explain Balrog’s reason for being bound to the crown. I had also seen the similarities in the names and wondered if Pixel had something in mind other than “a balrog is a big, strong monster and this toaster is rather tank-like.” I had thought about whether or not Ballos could have been Balrog’s father, but there wasn’t enough evidence. Later, I thought that Misery had created him, and he had to follow Misery’s orders, not the crowns. He later said himself that he was under the curse of the crown. That ruled out that idea and I just let that train of thought die, until I paid closer attention to the line previously mentioned.
He calls Jenka auntie. The only sibling Jenka is ever mentioned to have is Ballos. She would thus be the aunt of Ballos’ late son. If Ballos killed his son, then how would Balrog have Jenka as an aunt unless we pulled new characters out of our… well, you know where that was going. Anyway, let’s say BalrogwasBallos’ son. They look nothing alike. Balrog is either robotic or a heavily armored biological being. Ballos is a… wizard? Warlock? Human seeming, at least. On top of that, the fact that he killed his son is still glaring at us coldly. So Ballos killed his son Balrog. Balrog may have been perfectly human-ish back then. Jenka seals Ballos away as his magic rages out of control. Left behind are his poor son’s charred bones or other such remains. Then comes Misery, there to get her uncle to forge the demon crown. Naturally, the loss of her cousin and aunt didn’t go without affecting her mentally in some way. She, too, is a witch. On top of that, she has a talent for creating zombies, as seen by the dragons and the core. She, therefore, has some experience with resurrections in a way. She sees her cousin’s remains. Either she creates a new body for his soul to live in (like the Alfons Elric in “Full Metal Alchemist”) or she has that body made and, using the powers of the Demon Crown, puts her cousin’s soul/personality into it.
If the latter is true, then that explains why he’s bound to the crown; he’s a product of it. If it was the former, then the details are a little more blurry and the train of thought has likely reached a dead end. Either way, though, it explains why he always does what Misery says. He owes her his life. (/end_Spoiler)
To wrap up what we’ve learned, I’d say that Balrog is Ballos’ son’s immortal soul transferred into the body of a rocket-launching toaster with a debt owed to his cousin and a curse bestowed upon him. GOOD DAY!- err, night.
Picture taken from the Cave Story wiki.

I was just playing Cave Story… again. This has got to be about the eleventh or above time I’ve done so. At any rate, when I first started this blog, two ideas were in my head. One was the deal with Ballos’ name. That was my first post. I was going to post the second, then realized I was jumping to conclusions and to bring notice to such a fanciful idea was just plain unprofessional. Recently, however, I purchased Cave Story + on Steam. In this version, the dialogue is somewhat changed, mostly for the worse in my opinion, but there are worse things that could have happened. One line in particular caught me off guard upon hearing for the, I don’t know, sixth time? You speak with a woman in the sand zone named Jenka and this guy right here says “Hello auntie.” This guy’s name is Balrog. He was one of the two antagonists who were cursed. Now here’s the part where this blows your mind.

(Spoiler/) Ballos says at the end that he watched his wife and son burn/die as he laughed. This way you know that he had a family other than his older sister, Jenka. I had previously looked for any connection between Balrog and Ballos that would explain Balrog’s reason for being bound to the crown. I had also seen the similarities in the names and wondered if Pixel had something in mind other than “a balrog is a big, strong monster and this toaster is rather tank-like.” I had thought about whether or not Ballos could have been Balrog’s father, but there wasn’t enough evidence. Later, I thought that Misery had created him, and he had to follow Misery’s orders, not the crowns. He later said himself that he was under the curse of the crown. That ruled out that idea and I just let that train of thought die, until I paid closer attention to the line previously mentioned.

He calls Jenka auntie. The only sibling Jenka is ever mentioned to have is Ballos. She would thus be the aunt of Ballos’ late son. If Ballos killed his son, then how would Balrog have Jenka as an aunt unless we pulled new characters out of our… well, you know where that was going. Anyway, let’s say BalrogwasBallos’ son. They look nothing alike. Balrog is either robotic or a heavily armored biological being. Ballos is a… wizard? Warlock? Human seeming, at least. On top of that, the fact that he killed his son is still glaring at us coldly. So Ballos killed his son Balrog. Balrog may have been perfectly human-ish back then. Jenka seals Ballos away as his magic rages out of control. Left behind are his poor son’s charred bones or other such remains. Then comes Misery, there to get her uncle to forge the demon crown. Naturally, the loss of her cousin and aunt didn’t go without affecting her mentally in some way. She, too, is a witch. On top of that, she has a talent for creating zombies, as seen by the dragons and the core. She, therefore, has some experience with resurrections in a way. She sees her cousin’s remains. Either she creates a new body for his soul to live in (like the Alfons Elric in “Full Metal Alchemist”) or she has that body made and, using the powers of the Demon Crown, puts her cousin’s soul/personality into it.

If the latter is true, then that explains why he’s bound to the crown; he’s a product of it. If it was the former, then the details are a little more blurry and the train of thought has likely reached a dead end. Either way, though, it explains why he always does what Misery says. He owes her his life. (/end_Spoiler)

To wrap up what we’ve learned, I’d say that Balrog is Ballos’ son’s immortal soul transferred into the body of a rocket-launching toaster with a debt owed to his cousin and a curse bestowed upon him. GOOD DAY!- err, night.

Picture taken from the Cave Story wiki.


Q
so me and a few of my friends have been battling the question: can time exist without life? i believe it cant because life creates time and with the absence of life comes the absence of time. it would help if you explain you opinion. thank you
A

I can see and relate to this view point. When I see time, however, I see it affecting more than what is strictly described as alive. It is my belief that, without life, time would not be defined, appreciated, or given a glance in any way. It would doubtlessly, though, still affect many things not considered alive. Nebulae would continue in their trajectory, stars would burn out, planets would rotate, and natural satellites would orbit. To say time would cease is to deny motion. I suppose that the answer here really depends on what you consider alive, but I’d say that as long as even the tiniest particle exists, there’s proof of time.

What if there wasn’t? Would time still be present? With nothing to measure it with and nothing for it to affect, it may as well not exist, but does lack of purpose or lack of effect mean lack of existence? Some would argue no, pointing out various examples. Others would claim yes, taking on a more spiritual perspective. Me? I’m just going to answer your initial question saying that time, by all logic, would exist, but it is hard to say whether or not it could exist alone.